You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Confidentiality Orders’ category.

For many of us midnight on December 31st rings in new resolutions and a sense of excitement for the upcoming year.  In New Jersey this year the New Year will ring in new rights for adults that were adopted as children prior to August 1, 2015.  Significant changes in New Jersey’s adoption laws will now let adult adoptees request information from the State of New Jersey about their birth parents, including their original birth certificate. This information was not previously available to them if they were adopted in a closed adoption.  While this change in the law is wonderful news for those who are searching for answers about their birth and where they come from, it can be frightening for birth parents who believed their identity would never be revealed.  As with most family law issues there is fine balance to be reached in assuring that everyone is treated fairly.  For birth parents who do not wish for their identity to be revealed they have until December 31, 2016 to file forms with the State of New Jersey requesting no contact from the adopted child and redacting the child’s birth certificate to remove any information that identifies them as the birth parent.  If you or anyone in your family has questions about the upcoming changes in the adoption privacy rules and the record system for birth parents contact one of our experienced attorneys at IANDOLI & EDENS (908) 879-9499.

Advertisements

Ever wonder what a Confidentiality Agreement is? Or perhaps you have heard it called a Confidentiality Order or Protective Order. These documents are used in family law for many reasons. The broad purpose of these orders is to forbid both the attorneys and the litigants from releasing information that one or both parties do not want released. Johnny Depp is asking Amber Heard to sign a Confidentiality Agreement to keep their (his) financial documents from being accessible to the public, or more specifically, the media. Judges also often use Confidentiality or Protective Orders if they are disseminating psychological information regarding the parties or their children. Specifically in N.J., if DCP&P (formerly DYFS) issues a report on a family they have investigated, the Court will often not release these reports, or if they do, they will be released under a Confidentiality Order. Also in Family Court, if there is a forensic report about a business held by one of the parties, it is not uncommon for a Protective Order to be entered so that competitors cannot have access to private issues regarding the business. Family law attorneys regularly ask the Courts to enter these Orders. If you think you would benefit from having a Protective or Confidentiality Order in place, contact one of our experienced family law attorneys at IANDOLI & EDENS (908) 879-9499 to discuss your specific situation.