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There are so many attorneys, you may be wondering where and how to start your search for your divorce attorney. One tip, of course, is to look at the attorney’s website. You may also want to ask professionals, such as other attorneys, therapists and psychologists. You may want to ask family members and friends and learn of their own experiences. Most definitely, you will want to interview the attorney you are considering. The attorney you hire should handle a significant amount of family law cases. Importantly, you want to have a rapport with that attorney. You don’t want to feel reluctant to discuss personal issues with your attorney. You want to be comfortable expressing your concerns and the matters that are most important to you.

For a consultation, call one of our experienced family law attorneys who know how to listen at Iandoli & Edens at (908) 879 9499 or click here http://www.iandoliedens.com to learn more about us.

Many times litigants are faced with two options: take their case to trial or settle. Often, it is an extremely difficult decision to make. One must evaluate the pros and cons of settlement versus the risk of having their case proceed to trial. In the event your case proceeds to trial, it will be left in the hands of a neutral judge who could, or could not, rule in your favor. But then again, seldom is there a true “winner” in a settlement.
Here are a couple of helpful tips to help you decide whether settlement is right for you.
First, make a list of all of the issues in your case. For instance, real property, personal property, custody, child support, debts and alimony are often debated issues in divorce cases.
Second, write how you would like to resolve the issue. Here is an example of a list:
1. House. I want to sell it and divide any proceeds equally.
2. Custody. I want to have liberal time with the children. I want three weeks of summer vacation. I will agree to alternate holidays.
3. Personal property. I want the dining room furniture, living room furniture and the things in the garage. My spouse can have the rest.
4. Child Support. I will agree to use the NJ child support guidelines.
5. Debts. I will pay my credit cards. My spouse to pay student loans.
6. Alimony. I want permanent alimony. I need $2,500 per month.
7. Business. I want 40% of my spouses’ business.
8. Other. Our retirement assets should be divided equally.
Third, ask for your spouses’ position on the same issues. Review each item to determine if you can agree on certain issues. This will help highlight the items which remain in dispute, if any.

Finally, evaluate whether a settlement is possible. If so, settlement may be more cost effective and will save you a lot of time. However, if your spouse will not negotiate issues that are important to you or you feel as if your goals under step two will have to be compromised beyond what you find is reasonable, then, perhaps, having a judge decide your matter at trial may be the best scenario.
Contact an attorney at Iandoli & Edens, LLC to learn more. Call us today at 908.879.9499 or visit us on the web at http://www.iandoliedens.com.

Iandoli and Edens is collecting non-perishable food for the Backpack Program. It is a charitable organization which collects and distributes food to parents of children. If you would like to contribute, we will keep a box in our waiting room for non-perishable food items. The program has suggested:

•Cereal-low sugar, child friendly
•Canned tuna or chicken
•Macaroni “N” cheese
•Peanut butter and jelly
•Pancake mix and syrup
•Applesauce and fruit (single serve), no sugar added
•Shelf-stable milk
•Meals in a can, like Dinty Moore and Chef Boyardee
•Granola type snack bars
•Raisins, individually boxed

It is not uncommon for a spouse who has filed a Complaint for Divorce to question his/her decisionGiven the many emotions that surface during divorce proceedings, sometimes a spouse may wonder if he/she should give their partner one last chance.

Spouses should give special attention to their present circumstances when making this decision. If the reconciliation does not last and the spouse who previously dismissed their Complaint now wants to re-file their Complaint, his/her support obligations and/or share of equitable distribution may have substantially increased or decreased since the time of the initial filing.  In most cases, the courts will look to the date of the second filing (re-filed Complaint) in making impactful financial decisions.

If you or someone you know is in a similar situation, it may be wise for that person to meet with a family law attorney to discuss the particulars of their situation and any alternative they may have.  In some cases, spouses may choose to execute a Reconciliation Agreement whereby certain spousal expectations are delineated along with agreed upon financial distributions if a divorce occurs. Our attorneys are here to help you.  Please call us at (908) 879-9499.